Apparently not much has changed when it comes to concerts in Beirut (since the 60s at least). You still have the screaming crowd which seems to generate the “this is my most memorable concert” response from all artists:

“The more they screamed, the better we played,” recalls Charles Springer with a smile from the couch of his Silver Sands, Christ Church home. Springer, The Ranglers’ drummer, was the first on stage that night and remembers his days in Lebanon as the best of his musical journey.

Not only that, but we were just as racist in the 60s:

…a group of eight musicians waited in a nightclub dressing room. They were called onto the stage one by one. The nervous agent said this was a necessity. After all, The Ranglers were the first black group to play at the club. Who knew how they would be received?

However, all went well:

Despite the thick tension of the moment, the band was received with excited screams that signalled their instant acceptance by Lebanese club-goers.

This goes to show that no matter what happens, we Lebanese will remain true to our nature, for good or for bad.

Actually, the only thing that has changed is the La Revue du Liban. It apparently used to be in broadsheet:

Charles Springer proudly displaying the Ranglers front page picture in the Lebanese publication La Revue Du Liban.

Charles Springer proudly displaying the Ranglers front page picture in the Lebanese publication La Revue Du Liban.